Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction announces longlist of nominees

Timed to coincide with International Women’s Day, the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction announced the longlist of 16 nominees for the prestigious literary award. The prize is for a full-length work of fiction in English by a woman anywhere in the world (previously, the award had been limited to writers from the UK and Commonwealth nations).

This year’s finalists include well-known authors such as Margaret Atwood, Mary Gaitskill, and Annie Proulx, and debut novelists like Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀, Emma Flint, and Fiona Melrose. Past winners Linda Grant, Eimear McBride, and Rose Tremain return to the longlist as well. This year’s nominees hail from the US, the UK, Ireland, Canada, South Africa, and Nigeria.

The selections were made by an all-female panel of judges: CEO of House Productions Tessa Ross, broadcaster Katie Derham, comedian Sara Pascoe, writer Aminatta Forna, and journalist Sam Baker.

“The judges had a large number of books of extraordinary quality to choose from this year, and so I can’t say that it was an easy process to come up with a list as short as 16,” said Ross. “However, we’re all thrilled by where we’ve ended up and truly excited by the quality and range of talent on this year’s longlist. It’s a great showcase for the very best contemporary women’s fiction – we hope that it will inspire readers everywhere.”

The shortlist of six novels will be revealed on April 5, with the winner to be announced at a ceremony on June 7. The winner will receive 30,000 GBP (USD $36,465).

The nominees:

Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀, Stay With Me

Naomi Alderman, The Power

Margaret Atwood, Hag-Seed

Emma Flint, Little Deaths

Mary Gaitskill, The Mare

Linda Grant, The Dark Circle

Eimear McBride, The Lesser Bohemians

Fiona Melrose, Midwinter

C.E. Morgan, The Sport of Kings

Yewande Omotoso, The Woman Next Door

Heather O’Neill, The Lonely Hearts Hotel

Sarah Perry, The Essex Serpent

Annie Proulx, Barkskins

Gwendoline Riley, First Love

Madeleine Thien, Do Not Say We Have Nothing

Rose Tremain, The Gustav Sonata

Los Angeles Times Book Prizes finalists announced

sweet-lamb-of-heaven   swing-time   innocents-and-others

spill-simmer-falter-wither  ways-to-disappear  the-bed-moved

Finalists for the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes were announced on Feb. 22. A total of 55 finalists were named in eleven categories.

In the Fiction category, three women writers were nominated: Lydia Millet, Zadie Smith, and Dana Spiotta.

Finalists in the First Fiction category include another trio of women: Sara Baume, Idra Novey, and Rebecca Schiff.

Strangely, The Girls by Emma Cline was nominated in the Mystery/Thriller category.

The prizes will be awarded on the evening of April 21, the night before the annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books begins at the University of Southern California.

Last year’s winners included Valeria Luiselli in Fiction for The Story of My Teeth and Chigozie Obioma in First Fiction for The Fishermen.

FICTION

What Belongs to You by Garth Greenwell

Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett

Sweet Lamb of Heaven by Lydia Millet

Swing Time by Zadie Smith

Innocents and Others by Dana Spiotta

THE ART SEIDENBAUM AWARD FOR FIRST FICTION

Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume

The Whale: A Love Story by Mark Beauregard

The Nix by Nathan Hill

Ways to Disappear by Idra Novey

The Bed Moved by Rebecca Schiff

 

All finalists for Barnes & Noble’s “Discover Great New Writers” fiction award are women

the-lightkeepers  Homegoing  shelter

Abby Geni’s The Lightkeepers (Counterpoint Press), Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing (Knopf), and Jung Yun’s Shelter (Picador) were today named the finalists in the fiction category of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Award.

The nonfiction category included Hope Jahren’s Lab Girl, a memoir about her life as a botanist, as well as Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond and Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America by Patrick Phillips.

Books are nominated by Barnes & Noble booksellers, and the finalists and winners are chosen by a committee of six distinguished writers.

In The Lightkeepers, according to the B&N announcement, “a young woman finds herself surrounded by an unreliable cast of characters on a remote archipelago–and caught in a murder mystery. Abby Geni’s sense of place and haunting narrative voice reminded us of Eowyn Ivey’s bestselling Discover pick The Snow Child and 2014 Discover Award Winner (Fiction), All the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld.”

The Lightkeepers was longlisted for the Center for Fiction’s 2016 First Novel Prize, received starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews, and was praised by Francine Prose in the New York Times Book Review.

Homegoing “follows two branches of a family—one in America and the other in Africa–over 300 years, and the writing is so assured that it’s hard to believe this is a debut. This heartbreaking, beautiful book reminded us of Toni Morrison’s exquisite novels and an earlier Discover pick, The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis.”

Gyasi’s debut novel won the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard First Book Prize, was named Debut Novel of the Year by NPR, and was shortlisted for the Center for Fiction’s 2016 First Novel Prize. It was named a New York Times 2016 Notable Book, one of Oprah’s 10 Favorite Books of 2016, and one of  Time‘s Top 10 Novels of 2016.

Regarding Shelter, B&N said, “Our jaws dropped as we read the shocking opening, and we couldn’t stop turning pages as a young father is forced to face his past – and his parents – in order to save his family’s future. This is a must-read for anyone who compulsively read Celeste Ng’s bestseller Everything I Never Told You.”

Shelter was longlisted for the Center for Fiction’s 2016 First Novel Prize, named one of the most anticipated books of the year by The Millions, and was the #1 Most Buzzed About Book of the Year in Buzz Feed. It received positive reviews in the New York Times, The New Yorker, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago TribuneEntertainment Weekly, The Wall Street Journal, and Library Journal (starred review).

PEN America announces 2017 Literary Awards finalists

PEN America has announced the finalists for its 2017 Literary Awards.

Awards will be announced on their website on February 22 in 10 categories, as well as in nine special categories for career achievement and manuscripts. However, winners of the PEN/Jean Stein Book Award, PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, and the PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature will be announced live on March 27 at the 2017 PEN America Literary Awards Ceremony, which will be held at The New School’s John L. Tishman Auditorium in Manhattan.

With the addition of four new prizes, this year’s awards will be the largest ever, conferring nearly $315,000 to writers and translators spanning the fields of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, biography, essay, translation, and more.

Finalists in the Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction include Clare Beams for We Show What We Have Learned, Brit Bennett for The Mothers, and Yaa Gyasi for Homecoming. The judges in this category are Jami Attenberg, Tanwi Nandini Islam, Randall Kenan, Hanna Pyalvainen, and Akhil Sharma.

weshowwhatwehavelearnedcover  the-mothers  Homegoing

The short list for the PEN Open Book Award, to recognize an exceptional book-length work of literature by an author of color, includes Petina Gappah for The Book of Memory, Helen Oyeyemi for What is Not Yours is Not Yours: Stories, Solmaz Sharif for Look: Poems, and Monica Youn for Blackacre: Poems. The judges are Ishmael Beah, Major Jackson, and Bich Minh (Beth) Nguyen.

the-book-of-memory  what-is-not-yours-is-not-yours  blackacre  look

PEN America also gives out awards in several categories in which there are no finalists, such as the Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature, the Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers, and the Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry to recognize an emerging American poet.

You can see the complete list of finalists here.

PEN American Center is the U.S. branch of the world’s leading international literary and human rights organization. PEN International was founded in 1921 in direct response to the ethnic and national divisions that contributed to the First World War. PEN American Center was founded in 1922 and is the largest of the 144 PEN centers in 101 countries that together comprise PEN International.

PEN America announces longlist for 2017 Literary Awards

PEN America, based in New York City, has begun announcing the longlists of nominees for its 2017 Literary Awards. The awards are given out in a wide range of categories: debut fiction, general nonfiction, essays, biography, poetry, sports writing, lifetime achievement in literary sports writing, science, fiction and poetry in translation, drama (master dramatist, mid-career playwright, emerging playwright), emerging writers (awarded to 12 writers of short stories), the open book award (a full-length work by a writer of color), literary magazine editor, and a translation fund grant.

Nominees in four categories were announced on Dec. 5. The longlists in the other categories will be announced Dec. 7-9.

The finalists will be revealed on January 17, with winners to be announced on February 22.  The awards ceremony is scheduled for March 27 at the New School in New York City. (Four winners will not be announced until the awards ceremony: debut fiction, essay, the PEN/Jean Stein Book Award, and the PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature.)

The ten nominees for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction include seven women:

Insurrections by Rion Amilcar Scott

We Show What We Have Learned by Clare Beams

The Mothers by Brit Bennett

The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang

When Watched: Stories by Leopoldine Core

Hide by Matthew Griffin

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Tuesday Nights in 1980 by Molly Prentiss

Hurt People by Cote Smith

Wreck and Order by Hannah Tennart-Moore

 

The ten nominees for the PEN Open Book Award include eight women:

Blackass by A. Igoni Barrett

Chronicle of a Last Summer: A Novel of Egypt by Yasmine El Rashidi

The Book of Memory by Petina Gappah

The Big Book of Exit Strategies by Jamaal May

Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours: Stories by Helen Oyeyemi

Look (poetry) by Solmaz Sharif

Problems by Jade Sharma

Cannibal (poetry) by Safiya Sinclair

Blackacre (poetry) by Monica Youn

 

Four of the ten nominees for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award are female:

The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

The Glass Universe by Dava Sobel

The Dragon Behind the Glass: A True Story of Power, Obsession, and the World’s Most Coveted Fish by Emily Voigt

 

A Personal Message from the Proprietor: Argus Editorial Services is open for business

argus-editorial-cover-photo

I’ve been writing and editing for over 35 years — and teaching these skills for nearly 20 years.

After several years practicing law in the 1990s and nearly two decades teaching high school English and Journalism, I’ve decided to open up shop as a professional editor and writer.

I created Argus Editorial Services to help anyone who needs an expert to review, copy edit, or proofread their work, whether it’s a manuscript of a story or novel, business marketing materials, a thesis, or website and social media content.

I chose the name Argus because, like the mythological watchman with a hundred eyes, my mission is to ensure that your writing is as close to flawless as it can be.

If you’re looking for an editor with an eagle eye to polish your work to a high gloss, I hope you’ll consider Argus Editorial Services.

For more info, including a complete bio and rates, visit https://arguseditorial.com.


“Bill Wolfe is that rare editor who thinks like a writer. He thinks about flow, about character, about context. I came to him as I was about to share my manuscript with agents and wanted to avoid embarrassing typos. He fixed the typos, but he also gave me great suggestions for changing dialogue, addressing inconsistencies or, in several places, fixing anachronisms in my historical fiction. I trust him to make my writing better and cleaner.”

Phyllis W. Jordan, author of Taking the Waters

“With Bill’s help, my manuscript is tighter, cleaner, and stronger and something I can now feel proud to put my name on. I was surprised to see my pages riddled with errors, from overused words and phrases to improper sentence structure and inconsistent tenses. Bill’s service extends beyond a basic grammatical sweep and clean-up. He offers advice on the layout of scenes, character voice, and description of setting, and he made me rethink certain adjectives and verbs for greater effect. There is a real value in professionally-edited work. I will never again submit another book without Bill’s strategic advice and thorough polishing.”

Suzanne Simonetti, author of The Butterfly Garden 

NBCC announces finalists for John Leonard Prize

the-mothers  The Girls  

Here Comes the Sun  Homegoing

The National Book Critics Circle announced on November 30 the finalists for the prestigious John Leonard Prize for best first novel. Four of the six finalists are women, three of whom are POC (Bennett, Dennis-Benn, and Gyasi). Four finalists are American; Dennis-Benn is a Jamaican living in Brooklyn and Max Porter is British. Gyasi was born in Ghana but moved to the U.S. at age two.

The Mothers by Brit Bennett (Riverhead)
The Girls by Emma Cline (Random House)
Here Comes the Sun by Nicole Dennis-Benn (Liveright)
Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi (Knopf)
The Nix by Nathan Hill (Knopf)
Grief is the Thing with Feathers by Max Porter (Graywolf)

The finalists were determined by a membership-wide submission process, with the books receiving the most nominations being designated as the finalists. A new procedure for determining the winner was put in place this year. Approximately 50 members who volunteered to read all the finalists in a four-t0-six week period will choose the prize winner.

The winner will be announced in January. The John Leonard Prize will be presented at the NBCC Awards Ceremony at The New School in New York City on March 16, 2017.